FreshRSS

πŸ”’
❌ About FreshRSS
There are new available articles, click to refresh the page.
Yesterday β€” August 17th 201902 - Art : Mandalas & Stuffs

Chrome Face Masks and Hyperrealistic Oil Portraits by Kip Omolade

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn X, Oil on canvas, 48 x 48 in. All images via Kip Omolade

Brooklyn-based artist Kip Omolade (previously) uses molding, casting, and painting techniques to create detailed masks and large-scale hyperrealistic portraits. Contrasted against vibrant backgrounds, each chrome face appears to rise from the canvas to meet the viewer. Continuing his Diovadiova Chrome series, Omolade’s recent work explores form, connections, and the basics of what makes us human.

Since we last featured his work in 2017, Kip Omolade’s portraits have evolved to include more than one subject. “In my paintings, I previously presented each mask as a singular portrait,” he told Colossal. “In my current work, the faces are now interacting with each other. They are arranged together on large canvases measuring 13-15 feet long. The masks have become mythological characters having conversations about humanity. I see them as deities pondering age old questions about birth, life, death, identity and love.”

He has also included his three children in his work for the first time. Their portraits, titled Diovadiova Chrome Triumph after a Wu-Tang song, represent “life’s ability to survive despite environmental and societal hardships. Reflections of Times Square New York City are captured within their portraits. In a seemingly eternal sleep, they are depicted with their eyes closed…still innocent to the world.”

Kip Omolade is opening a pop-up art show in New York City on September 9. Titled The Diovadiova – Avoid a Void, the show will be open to the public at 520 West 23rd Street. For more upcoming event news and progress shots of his work, give the artist a follow on Instagram.

Diovadiova Chrome Triumph work in progress

Diovadiova Chrome Triumph work in progress

Diovadiova Chrome Kip Triptych III detail, Oil on canvas, 74 x 36 in

Diovadiova Chrome Diana IV, Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in

Diovadiova Chrome Trinity, Oil on canvas, 120 x 186 in

Diovadiova Chrome Tribunal work in progress

Diovadiova Chrome Tribunal, Oil on canvas, 120.5 x 156.5 in

Diovadiova Chrome Joyce IV detail, Oil on canvas, 72 x 34 in

Diovadiova Chrome Kip Triptych I detail, Oil on canvas, 74 x 36 in

Profiled in the video below by filmmaker Jesse Brass (previously), Omolade speaks about immortality, form, universal beauty, and what it means to be a diva.

A New Book Compiling Hundreds of Timeless Feline Photos by Walter Chandoha is the Cat’s Meow

1955. All photographs © 2019 Walter Chandoha, courtesy of Taschen

A new book chronicles over seventy-five years of photographer Walter Chandoha’s images of cats.  Around 1950, Chandoha found a kitten outside in the winter snow. The cat, who he adopted and named Loco (shown in the photo below dated 1951), started the photographer’s affinity for documenting cats, which continued for the rest of his life. The New York-based photographer, who passed away earlier this year, was quite prolific. His archive contains over 225,000 photos, including about 90,000 of his feline friends. Hundreds of these charming, often candid photographs are compiled in a new 296-page book published by Taschen, with writing and editing by Susan Michals and Reuel Golden, respectively. The book was released on August 12, 2019, and is available online. (via Creative Review)

Astoria, 1951

Chandoha’s Long Island home studio, 1955

New Jersey, 1961

New Jersey, 1982

New York City, 1950

Sparkling Balls of Paint and Glitter Explode and Absorb in a New Experimental Short Film by Rus Khasanov

Filmmaker Rus Khasanov (previously) was working on a challenging shoot in Seoul, South Korea when he got the idea for this latest experimental film, Unity. The short work follows hundreds of paint bubbles as they roll, explode, and merge across the screen, creating dazzling bursts in shades of purples, oranges, pinks, and blues set to a soundtrack by Dmitry Evgrafov. Khasanov had been attempting to make two paint balls merge perfectly for his original commercial shoot, which he was finally able to achieve on the last day of shooting by chance and luck.

After several various ingredient experiments, he was able to learn how to get paint balls to absorb without bursting. “When you master the technique,” he explains, “you can already playfully turn the flaws into advantages: now in the bursting paint ball I see not a nightmare, but a bright colorful explosion which reminds me of fireworks.”

The film has elements that are in sharp focus while others imitate the bokeh effect, showcasing the sparkling paint elements in a soft out-of-focus that makes the entire thing seem like the bright spots of a blurred photograph. You can see more of Khasanov’s short films on Vimeo and Instagram.

Before yesterday02 - Art : Mandalas & Stuffs

Bizarre D.I.Y. Balloon-Destroying Devices by Jan Hakon Erichsen

Don’t invite Jan Hakon Erichsen to your next birthday party. The Norwegian artist is on a mission to destroy every balloon he encounters with an endless array of awkward Rube Goldberg-esque setups. Erichsen documents his inventions in “Destruction Diary” videos, which he posts daily on Instagram, and aggregates into compilations on YouTube. Erichsen’s usual balloon-popping tool of choice is a steak knife, but he has also employed bananas, cacti, and saws to do the deed. The artist explains in a statement that he “works within a variety of media focusing on topics like fear, anger and frustration”. In addition to his balloon-centric video work, Erichson explores other found materials in his structural D.I.Y. projects, which you can see on his website. If you enjoy Erichsen’s creations, also check out Simone Giertz’s robots.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Jan Hakon Erichsen (@janerichsen) on

Confidence is less like a power and more like a skill. Kind of like whistling. It’s something that...

Confidence is less like a power and more like a skill. Kind of like whistling. It’s something that you know you want to do so you start practicing until one day you’re a whistling-ass motherfucker.

Winnie Harlow

Dynamic Photographs of Interconnected Figures by Rob Woodcox Take Center Stage With a Squarespace Portfolio Site

Photographer Rob Woodcox (previously) travels the world to bring athletes and dancers together in visually captivating locations and poses. The 29-year-old artist first picked up a camera about ten years ago and hasn’t looked back. Woodcox works with a diverse array of models both in studio environments and in deserts and metropolises. A combination of on-site practical effects and post-production editing create the fantastical final images.

Woodcox grew up in Michigan, and shares with Colossal that the lack of a robust local creative industry spurred his imaginative, DIY approach. Woodcox found creative community online, where he connected with likeminded photographers. The scale of his projects grew as his network expanded, and now Woodcox frequently works on client commissions in addition to his personal practice. As his professional identity has evolved over the past eight years, Squarespace has stayed Woodcox’s website platform of choice. Its seamless user experience allows his work to take center stage. “When you’re doing creative work, the website just needs to be simple, clean, and easy to use. And that’s Squarespace. If it’s inhibiting the user’s experience, then that’s a problem,” Woodcox shares with Colossal. 

“Pursuing projects with real people and being a part of things that matter” keeps Woodcox inspired. Teaching workshops has been a huge part of the photographer’s career: to date, he has taught over eighty workshops on five continents. Squarespace’s ecommerce integrations allow students to register for workshops (the next one is in Portland, Oregon) and collectors to purchase fine art prints. An embedded newsletter signup form lets Woodcox’s audience keep up with his latest projects.

“It’s fun to think about what people haven’t even seen yet. I have visions that are so much bigger even than anything I’ve done so far,” Woodcox tells Colossal. “That’s an exciting thing as an artist. I don’t think I’m ever going to run out of fuel. There’s so much that I want to do.”

Ready to show the world your creative potential? Head over to Squarespace.com for a free weeklong trial, and if you like what you see, use code COLOSSAL at checkout to save 10% on your purchase of a website or domain name.

Advertisement

Geometric Portraits by Silvia Idili Overlay Clusters of Origami-Like Objects on Subjects’ Eyes, Noses, and Mouths

Milan-based painter Silvia Idili paints portraits of men and women that are partially obscured by folded geometric objects, incomplete masks that draw the audience deeper into the subjects’ gaze. Idili explains to JULIET that these origami-like additions featured in The Visionaries “are the symbol of infrastructures created by the mind to hide and mask the true nature of one’s being, which is at the same time an expression of a spiritual tension in relation to the anxiety of the contemporary.”

The portraits invite the audience to take a moment to reflect on their own inner gaze as they make eye contact with the guarded paintings. You can view more of Idili’s portraits and surrealist animal paintings on her website and Instagram. (via INAG)

❌